About

Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss

From there to here,
from here to there,
funny things are everywhere.
Dr. Seuss

Hello and welcome to drseussquotes.net, a blog by a random Dr. Seuss Fan. Here i will share some inspirational and motivational stuff by Dr. Seuss and others.

About Dr. Seuss-
Dr. Seuss ( March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer and illustrator best known for authoring popular children’s books under the pen name Dr. Seuss. His work includes several of the most popular children’s books of all time, selling over 600 million copies and being translated into more than 20 languages by the time of his death.

Theodor Seuss Geisel is his real name, he adopted his “Dr. Seuss” pseudonym during his university studies at Dartmouth College and the University of Oxford. After leaving Oxford in 1927 he began his career as an illustrator and cartoonist for Vanity Fair, Life, and various other publications. He also worked as an illustrator for advertising campaigns, most notably for Flit and Standard Oil, and as a political cartoonist for the New York newspaper PM. He published his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937. During World War II he worked in an animation department of the United States Army, where he produced several short films, including Design for Death, which later won the 1947 Academy Award for Documentary Feature.

After the war Geisel focused on his children’s books, writing classics such as If I Ran the Zoo, (1950), Horton Hears a Who! (1955), If I Ran the Circus (1956), The Cat in the Hat (1957), How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1957), and Green Eggs and Ham (1960). He published over 60 books during his career, which have spawned numerous adaptations, including 11 television specials, four feature films, a Broadway musical and four television series. He won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1958 for Horton Hatches the Egg and again in 1961 for And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. Geisel’s birthday, March 2, has been adopted as the annual date for National Read Across America Day, an initiative on reading created by the National Education Association.

Geisel left Oxford without earning a degree and returned to the United States in February 1927, where he immediately began submitting his work to magazines, book publishers, and advertising agencies. Making use of his time in Europe, he pitched a series of cartoons called Eminent Europeans to Life magazine, who passed on it. His first nationally published cartoon appeared in the July 16, 1927, issue of The Saturday Evening Post. This single $25 sale encouraged Geisel to move from Springfield to New York City.

Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss

Later that year, when he accepted a job as writer and illustrator at the humor magazine Judge, Geisel felt financially stable enough to marry Helen. His first cartoon for Judge appeared on October 22, 1927, and the Geisels were married on November 29. Geisel’s first work signed “Dr. Seuss” was published in Judge, about six months after he started working there.

Dr. Seuss earlier artwork often employed the shaded texture of pencil drawings or watercolors, but in children’s books of the postwar period, he generally employed the starker medium of pen and ink, normally using just black, white, and one or two colors. Later books such as The Lorax used more colors. He also follows the cartoon tradition of showing motion with lines, for instance in the sweeping lines that accompany Sneelock’s final dive in If I Ran the Circus. Cartoonists’ lines are also used to illustrate the action of the senses (sight, smell, and hearing) in The Big Brag and even of thought, as in the moment when the Grinch conceives his awful idea.

Dr. Seuss died of oral cancer on September 24, 1991, at his home in La Jolla at the age of 87. He was cremated and his ashes were scattered. On December 1, 1995, four years after his death, University of California, San Diego’s University Library Building was renamed Geisel Library in honor of Geisel and Audrey for the generous contributions they made to the library and their devotion to improving literacy.

While Seuss was living in La Jolla, the United States Postal Service and others frequently confused him with another La Jolla resident, Dr. Hans Suess. Their names have been linked together posthumously: the personal papers of Hans Suess are housed in the Geisel Library.

Over the course of his long career, Geisel wrote over 60 books. Though most were published under his well-known pseudonym, Dr. Seuss, he also authored over a dozen books as Theo LeSieg and one as Rosetta Stone. His books have topped many bestseller lists, sold over 600 million copies, and been translated into more than 20 languages. In 2000, Publishers Weekly compiled a list of the best-selling children’s books of all time; of the top 100 hardcover books, 16 were written by Geisel, including Green Eggs and Ham, at number 4, The Cat in the Hat, at number 9, and One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, at number 13. In the years after his death in 1991, two additional books were published based on his sketches and notes: Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! and Daisy-Head Mayzie. My Many Colored Days, originally written in 1973, was posthumously published in 1996. In September 2011, seven stories originally published in magazines during the 1950s were released in a collection entitled The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories.

Geisel also wrote a pair of books for adults: The Seven Lady Godivas (1939; reprinted 1987), a retelling of the Lady Godiva legend that included nude depictions; and You’re Only Old Once! (written in 1986 when Geisel was 82), which chronicles an old man’s journey through a clinic. His last book, published the year before his death, was Oh, the Places You’ll Go!, which became a popular gift for graduating students.

Dr. Seuss’s honors include two Academy awards, two Emmy awards, a Peabody award, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, and the Pulitzer Prize.

Notable works by Dr. Seuss

Horton Hears a Who! (1954)
The Cat in the Hat (1957)
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1957)
Green Eggs and Ham (1960)
The Lorax (1971)

Attribution – en.wikipedia.org/Dr.Seuss

All information produced or reproduced here is for educational and informational purposes to benefit site visitors, and is provided at no charge. Articles are published on this site purely for educational reasons, for the purpose of information and with good intentions.

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One Response to About

  1. I love Dr. Seuss too.

    Like

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